Episode 3 Transcript: English

For accessibility purposes, we have made the TransLash: Episode 3 transcript available in advance of the April 11, 2019, premiere in both English and Spanish. The Facebook Watch episode will also feature captions in both English and Spanish.

 

Episode 3: English

- [Imara] My mom died of cancer in 2011 before I transitioned, so I'm traveling back to Albany, Georgia, the place which formed her, to see if there are any clues as to how she would have come to see her daughter.

- [Darol] I'm trying to remember to drive a little slower, 'cause you know I drive fast.

- [Imara] Ain't nobody gonna know how fast you're going. Looking back at our personal history can give us power. Those who attack trans people pretend as if we come out of nowhere, that we spontaneously materialized. But like everyone, trans people come from somewhere. We have roots. We have family. We have history.

- [Darol] So what we're coming up on is the first house that I can remember, like about five years old.

- Wow. But you said it always looks like this.

- Always. That's what I remember, 'cause I used to be afraid to come over here.

- It was so weird. I met this white man who was from Albany, he was like late 60s, at a conference. It was so weird because we realized that we didn't have anything in common to talk about. When I was like oh, my mom went to Monroe, I realized all the high schools were segregated. They lived in two totally different worlds even though we're in the same place. It was really weird. So it was kinda awkward. They were in like a parallel universe.

- To your right is the house that your mom and those moved to after they left Cotton.

- Oh wow, it's nice. It's done burned out, but it's a nice house. How old do you think she was when they moved here?

- [Darol] She was a teenager. I'd say--

- 13, 14?

- Yeah. Right down here on the corner is where your mom and your uncle used to babysit. This looks so weird.

- [Imara] Memories of my father also fill these streets. My dad grew up one town over. The two of us are still resolving our relationship as father and daughter. Perhaps I'll be able to speak to that journey in a future episode.

- This is the house where Juanita and Clovis got married. It was this nice brick house right there. It was really beautiful. It was one of the prettiest houses in Albany. I was 10 years old and I was the flower girl.

- [Imara] So did Mama Rose help her get the dress or whatever?

- She bought the dress.

- She bought the dress? Wow.

- Mama Rose bought everything Juanita had because if she didn't, she'd be wearing dungarees all the time. That church right there? That is where Martin Luther King did all of his speaking, at that church and the one across the street. It was so crowded. He would leave one church and go to the other crowd in the other church, and then he would come back. He would walk back and forth all night. There's a lot of history here.

- Many clues into how my mother would have seen my transition can be found in her commitment to social justice. My mother told me about being arrested during the Albany movement.

- Mm-hmm.

- What'd you think when you first saw Dr. King? What'd you think of Dr. King when you first saw him?

- I thought he was a miraculous man, and a man that we needed to support.

- [Imara] All y'all went to the meetings together?

- Uh-huh. It was something that needed to be done, needed to be talked about, and so we went every night.

- You went every night?

- Every night.

- Maybe the insights are in who she was, how she was loved. I wanted to talk to you about my mother.

- Okay. She was like my own daughter. She was always very smart, very intelligent girl.

- Was she sweet as a child?

- Mm-hmm. Yes, she was.

- You got her ready for prom, didn't you?

- Mm-hmm. I got her ready for everything that she had to get ready for.

-You name it, huh?

- You name it.

- One of the things about you is how you don't do a lot of judging as a person.

- No, I don't do that. Everybody has to be what they wanna be.

- Right.

- And their own soul and spirit, so I don't go into that.

- Right.

- I always use the term my grandmother used.

- What'd she say?

- It is what it is.

- 'Cause everybody one their own journey, right?

- That's right.

- So that's beautiful.

- I accept you, darling.

- Thank you. Yes you do. Always have, no matter what.

- That's right.

- Everybody in your family, you just...

- You know I love you.

- I love you too. I appreciate you so much. All right, I'm gonna give you a hug.

- Yeah. Gosh, you're making me cry.

- Thank you.

- You're welcome, dear.

- [Imara] Would she have accepted me? I don't know, but I wonder what the youngest members of my family think. They are doing the hard, personal work to create a brave new world built on acceptance and understanding.

- Hi, I'm Ce'Aroh Roberts.

- Hi, I'm Courtney Roberts and I'm 14.

- And both of you are my cousins.

- Right.

- Yes.

- [Imara] How are you?

- We're great.

- Great.

- Are you still shocked?

- Yes. You are?

- I am.

- You're still shocked?

- Yes. I have to get used to it.

- [Courtney] Yeah, I have to get used to it.

- What is it? Seriously, is it just the breasts or is it everything?

- It's just the breasts.

- It's just that. Nothing else.

- Wow. So the makeup didn't bother you.

- Yes.

- No.

- The dresses, that didn't shock you?

- No, it didn't.

- [Imara] The breasts shocked you?

- The breasts shocked me. I mean, you went in from thug and I was like...

- It feels different.

- It felt very different.

- Now you have to start naming your breasts like me.

- What'd you name your breasts?

- Isabella and Tom.

- Tom? Did you name your breasts?

- No.

- Okay. So earlier today we were having a conversation in the kitchen, and when the topic of me being a woman came up, both of you all said that you weren't surprised.

- I always had the vibe that you were. I accepted it from the jump. You are who you are.

- And at the end of the day, you're still the same person we met when we were, like, super little.

- Right.

- It didn't change anything for us.

- Right.

- And we're glad that we got to see you become who you are.

- So when you heard that I was transitioning, what questions did you have?

- I knew about it.

- I already knew about it.

- How did y'all know about it?

- It's on Instagram.

- When I saw the post of you changing your gender, you said all that, with all the documents, I was really like transgender people are people.

- They're humans.

- Right, they're humans.

- They're equal to...

- And people think that you're supposed to be masculine or you're supposed to be feminine, or you're supposed to like women, or you're supposed to like men. And that's the part that causes controversy.

- You said that the transition helped you have courage to come out, right?

- Right.

- [Imara] How so?

- Seeing you, I told my friend about it, and he was like you should come out because it's probably the best time.

- And my mom was like, I guess she was trying to scare her.

- She fussed at me about it. She was like I don't want you to be this way. She started crying out of nowhere. She was like, I always thought that you would be a white picket fence.

- It's okay.

- My mom thought it would be like that her daughter would get married to a man at that time, but I had to go to therapy 'cause I didn't want my mama to feel that way. I wanted to keep my mom proud of me, and I thought she wouldn't be proud of me about it. But me and her had to go to counseling because we were fussing about the fact that I was the way I was. And I said mom, it was my choice. It was how I felt. I felt this way for a long time. And today, I told you.

- What's the importance, you think, of being family helping support people who are trans or LGBTQIA?

- Nobody can change who you are. God made you and you're a beautiful creation. Don't build somebody else's future. It's the other person's choice to be the way that they are. My sister didn't judge me, did you? She didn't judge me about what was happening, 'cause I feel like siblings would listen more than a parent.

- Well, thank you for taking the time to talk. I think that there's a lot that we can learn from just listening to you all.

- Thank you.

- Thank you.

- Thank you so much. But many families struggle with their trans members, and it has a lasting impact.

- I told my mom in April. April. And it was explosive. It was explosive! And she said a comment that I would never forget. She said, you know, I never saw this coming.

- [Imara] Child!

- And I said you are so embedded in your misogyny that you've convinced yourself--

- [Imara] You've convinced yourself.

- That you never saw this coming. It was a moment in which she had to come to a truth for herself that she had been in denial of. So that was our first real moment of we're having a conversation and you cannot escape it.

- My mom heard from my uncle that I was going to be having top surgery. She just started flipping out and sounding crazy on the phone and like, I can't be a part of this. It just broke my heart. And she used words like it's bad enough being gay. It swapped from me being sad to me being angry and disappointed because I felt like she got pregnant at 17. I accepted the life that she lived, and it was rougher before it was better. You know what I mean? But I still rode hard for her because she was my mom. But I just felt like I didn't receive the same. I think she thinks that it's a new idea based off of what everyone's doing now. What I had to explain to her is when I came out at 14, she made a very clear statement that she just didn't want to be a part of that aspect of my life. I just had to let her know, you know, you're missing out, and you missed out on a whole half of my life because I never have felt safe or comfortable talking to you about it.

- You know, on Facebook, ooh, I love my child. X, y, z, x, y, z. Oh yeah, you know, I just want you to be happy. But then amongst family, I'm misgendered. I'm called her son. She calls me her son.

- I'm sorry.

- The ones who are supposed to love me the most are the ones that give me the most trauma. I choose to not be around that.

- I grew up in a family where there was domestic violence, and my father was somebody who I absolutely did not want to grow up to be. Having to defend my mother from his physical assaults, one of the last times, I think actually the last time that I had to defend her, was when I cut him with a knife. In those moments, I didn't see myself as some little girl helping my mom. I was the boy who was gonna fight my father, and I was gonna be protecting my mother from this man.

- What's your thinking about the importance of family for trans people?

- So many of us have been shunned by the family that we were born into, and those family can be the cruelest, crueler than a stranger on the street. If it wasn't for my time at Brown, my time meeting people who were queer, I would have had no family. When I was disowned by my father, again, he ruled the roost, and my mom couldn't say anything about the fact that I couldn't come home. So where did I go during winter breaks, holiday breaks? I went home with some of my friends. My friendships were more than just friendships. They became family to me.

- [Person] We are a group of dangerous homosexual queers.

- The intersection of chosen family, art, especially performance art, and activism has fueled the fight for trans and LGBTQ rights since Stonewall 50 years ago, and it's shaping our future.

- My family has always been with Black queer folks from the moment I got to Atlanta until today. They're folks who took it upon themselves to make space, to be visible, to be organized together. Those are the folks that welcomed me. They understood what I was going through.

- What for you is the power or the strength in this blend of chosen family, artistry, and activism?

- I mean, the goal has always been to change hearts and minds. If you can do that, then that creates a pathway to be able to do the electoral stuff, the legislative wins, to be able to actually shift the material conditions of peoples' lives and get them support and housing and resources and access to things that they are usually barred from. I think that's the way to move things. But this has been an example in our history, like what actually allowed us to make a dent legislatively in civil rights was all of the upsurge of culture and the artists who are adamant about what needed to shift. Nina Simone, all these folks, right? And now today, I just wanna be able to celebrate the trans and queer folks who are trying to do that same walk of both liberation in their artistry and also community activism. It's putting the mirror to folks. Sometimes it's creating another vehicle for telling a story so that people can actually connect to the humanity, so they can actually connect themselves, right, in how the system plays out, and where they are in that role. I think that's our job. That our job as artists. That's our job as activists. That's our job as queer, trans folks who are trying to survive together, build community, celebrate each others' weirdness and our talents and our brilliance and our creativity, and thinking outside the box while always, always pushing for that vision that one day we won't have to struggle like this.

- [Imara] Because whether you come to family through blood or kinship or choice, family is what we fight for.

- Monte and Kiwan were amazing performers, artists. They were real in all the politics they supported. And sowe lost stars. I'm just gonna put it that way. We lost stars. Monte was the shit. Kiwan was the shit.

Episode 3 Transcript: Spanish

- Mi mamá murió de cáncer en el 2011 antes de mi transición, así que estoy viajando de regreso a Albany, Georgia, el lugar donde creció a ver si hay alguna pista sobre cómo habría visto a su hija. Intento recordar conducir un poco más lento, porque ya sabes que manejo rápido. Nadie va a saber a qué velocidad vas. En retrospectiva, nuestra historia puede darnos poder. Aquellos que atacan a las personas transexuales fingen que salimos de la nada, que aparecemos de manera espontánea. Pero igual que todos, los transexuales venimos de un lugar. Tenemos raíces. Tenemos familia. Tenemos historia. Así que venimos a la primera casa que recuerdo, de cuando tenía cinco años. Vaya. Pero dijiste que siempre se ve así. Siempre. Por eso la recuerdo, porque me daba miedo venir aquí. Fue muy extraño. Conocí a un hombre blanco que era de Albany, tenía como 60 años, en una conferencia. Era extraño porque nos dimos cuentas que no teníamos nada en común sobre qué hablar. Cuando dije: "Ah, mi mamá fue a Monroe", me di cuenta de que las secundarias estaban segregadas. Vivieron en dos mundos totalmente distintos, aunque estuvieron en el mismo lugar. Eso fue muy extraño. Así que fue bastante incómodo. Estaban como en un universo paralelo. A tu derecha está la casa a la que tu mamá y los demás se mudaron tras dejar Cotton. Vaya, es bonita. Está en pobres condiciones pero es una buena casa. ¿Qué edad crees que tenía cuando se mudaron aquí? Era adolescente.

- Yo diría...

- ¿13 o 14? Sí. Justo aquí en la esquina es donde tu mamá y tu tío cuidaban niños. Se ve muy extraño. Los recuerdos de mi padre también llenan las calles. Mi papá creció en un pueblo cercano. Seguimos tratando de resolver nuestra relación como padre e hija. Tal vez pueda hablar sobre ese viaje en un futuro episodio. Esta es la casa donde se casaron Juanita y Clovis. Fue en esta linda casa de ladrillos. Fue realmente hermoso. Era una de las casas más bonitas en Albany. Yo tenía 10 años y fui la niña de las flores. ¿Y mamá Rose le ayudó a ponerse el vestido y eso?

- Ella compró el vestido.

- ¿Compró el vestido? Vaya. Mamá Rose compró todo lo que Juanita tenía porque si no lo hacía, hubiera usado monos de trabajo todo el tiempo. ¿Y esa iglesia de ahí? Es donde Martin Luther King hizo sus oratorias, en esa iglesia y en aquella cruzando la calle. Siempre estaba lleno. Se iba de una iglesia y para estar con el otro grupo en la otra iglesia y luego volvía. Caminaba de ida y de regreso toda la noche. Aquí hay mucha historia. Muchas pistas sobre cómo mi madre habría visto mi transición se pueden encontrar en su compromiso con la justicia social. Mi madre me dijo que fue arrestada durante el movimiento Albany. ¿Qué pensaste la primera vez que viste al Dr. King? ¿Qué pensaste del Dr. King la primera vez que lo viste? Pensé que era un hombre milagroso, un hombre a quien debíamos apoyar. ¿Y fuiste con ella a todas sus reuniones? Sí. Era algo que debía hacerse, debía hablarse, así que íbamos todas las noches.

- ¿Fuiste todas las noches?

- Todas, sin falta. Tal vez la información esté en quién era, cómo la querían. Quería hablar contigo sobre mi madre. Está bien. Era como mi propia hija. Siempre fue muy lista, una chica muy inteligente.

- ¿Fue una niña dulce?

- Ajá. Sí, lo fue. Tú la arreglaste para su graduación, ¿verdad? Sí. La preparé para todo lo que necesitaba arreglarse.

- Lo que fuese.

- Lo que fuese. Una de las cosas sobre ti es que no juzgas mucho. No lo hago. Todos tienen que ser quien quieran ser. Claro. Y su propia alma y espíritu,

- así que no me meto con eso.

- Claro. Siempre uso el término que mi abuela usaba. ¿Qué decía? Las cosas son como son. Porque todos están en su propio viaje, ¿verdad? Es correcto. Eso es hermoso. Te acepto, cariño. Gracias. Así es.

- Siempre, sin importar qué.

- Es correcto. Todos en tu familia, tú solo...

- Sabes que te quiero.

- También te quiero. Te valoro muchísimo. Muy bien, te daré un abrazo. Sí. Me vas a hacer llorar.

- Gracias.

- De nada, cariño. ¿Ella me habría aceptado? No lo sé, pero me pregunto qué piensan los miembros más jóvenes de mi familia. Están haciendo el difícil trabajo personal de crear un valiente mundo nuevo construido en aceptación y comprensión. Hola, soy Ce'Aroh Roberts. Hola, soy Courtney Roberts y tengo 14 años. Y ambas son mis primas.

- Correcto.

- Sí. ¿Cómo están?

- Muy bien.

- Bien.

- ¿Siguen impactadas?

- Sí.

- ¿De verdad?

- Sí.

- ¿Sigues impactada?

- Sí. Tengo que acostumbrarme. Sí, tengo que acostumbrarme. ¿Qué pasa? ¿En serio? ¿Es solo por los pechos o es todo?

- Solo los pechos.

- Solo eso.

- Nada más.

- Vaya. Entonces el maquillaje no les molestó.

- Sí.

- No. Los vestidos no las impactaron. No. ¿Los pechos las impactaron? Los pechos nos impactaron. Digo, abriste los brazos para un abrazo y yo estaba como...

- Se siente diferente.

- Se sintió muy diferente. Ahora tienes que empezar a nombrar tus pechos igual que yo. ¿Qué nombres les pusiste? Isabella y Tom. ¿Tom?

- ¿Nombraste a tus pechos?

- No.

- Está bien. Hoy estuvimos hablando en la cocina, y cuando surgió el tema de que soy mujer, ambas dijeron que no estaban sorprendidas. Siempre sentí que lo eras. Lo acepté desde el principio. Tú eres quien eres. Y al final del día, sigues siendo la misma persona que conocimos cuando éramos niñas. Cierto. No cambió nada para nosotras. Claro. Y nos alegra poder verte convertida en quien realmente eres. Entonces cuando supieron que estaba haciendo la transición, ¿qué preguntas tenían?

- Ya lo sabía.

- Yo ya lo sabía. ¿Cómo supieron? Está en Instagram. Cuando vi la publicación de que ibas a cambiar de género, lo dijiste con todos los documentos, y yo pensé que la gente transgénero es gente.

- Son seres humanos.

- Sí, son seres humanos. Son iguales a... Y la gente cree que se supone que debas ser masculino o femenino, o que se supone que te gusten las mujeres o que se supone que te gusten los hombres. Y esa es la parte que causa controversia. Dijiste que la transición te ayudó a tener el valor

- para salir del closet, ¿no?

- Cierto. ¿De qué manera? Al verte, le conté a mi amigo y me dijo que debería salir del closet porque era probablemente el mejor momento. Y mi mamá estaba... Creo que solo intentaba asustarla. Hizo un alboroto sobre eso. Me dijo que no quería que yo fuera así. Empezó a llorar de la nada. Y ella me dijo: "Siempre pensé que serías de las esposas tradicionales". Tranquila. Mi mamá pensó que su hija se casaría con un hombre en ese momento, pero tuve que ir a terapia porque no quería que mi mamá se sintiera así. Quería que mi mamá estuviera orgullosa de mí, y pensé que no estaría orgullosa de mí. Pero ella y yo tuvimos que ir a terapia porque estábamos haciendo un escándalo sobre el hecho de que yo era como era. Y le dije: "Mamá, esta fue mi elección". Así me sentí. Me sentí así por mucho tiempo. Y hoy te lo dije. ¿Cuál es la importancia, según tú, de ayudar a apoyar como familia a las personas transexuales o LGBT? Nadie puede cambiar quién eres. Dios te hizo y eres una creación hermosa. No construyas el futuro de alguien más. Es la elección de la otra persona ser como es realmente. Mi hermana no me juzgó, ¿verdad? No me juzgó por lo que estaba pasando, porque siento que los hermanos escuchan más que un padre. Bueno, gracias por tomarte el tiempo para hablar. Creo que hay mucho que podemos aprender del solo hecho de escuchar.

- Gracias.

- Gracias. Muchas gracias. Pero muchas familias luchan con sus miembros transexuales, y eso tiene un impacto duradero. Le conté a mi mamá en abril. ARTISTA En abril. Y fue como una explosión. ¡Una explosión! E hizo un comentario que nunca olvidaré. Dijo: "Jamás lo hubiera imaginado". ¡Amiga! Y le dije: "Estás tan absorta en tu misoginia que te convenciste a ti misma"... Te convenciste a ti misma. ..."que jamás lo hubieras imaginado". En ese momento ella tuvo que sincerarse consigo misma de que había estado en negación. Ese fue nuestro primer momento real de tener una conversación de la que no podíamos escapar. Mi mamá escuchó decir a mi tío que me iban a hacer una cirugía. ARTISTA Y MAESTRO Se alteró totalmente, parecía una loca en el teléfono, y dijo que no podía ser parte de esto. Eso me rompió el corazón. Y usó frases como: "Ya de por sí es malo ser homosexual". Eso me hizo pasar de estar triste a estar molesto y decepcionado porque ella quedó embarazada a los 17. Acepté la vida que vivió, y fue más difícil antes de hacerse más fácil. ¿Entiendes lo que quiero decir? Pero aun así la apoyé porque era mi mamá. Pero sentí que no recibí el mismo apoyo. Creo que ella piensa que es una nueva idea basada en lo que todos están haciendo. Lo que tenía que haberle explicado... Cuando salí del closet a los 14, me dejó muy en claro que no quería ser parte de ese aspecto de mi vida. Solo tenía que hacerle saber, ya sabes, que se estaba perdiendo prácticamente la mitad de mi vida porque nunca me sentí a salvo o cómodo hablando con ella al respecto. Ya sabes, en Facebook pone: "Ay, amo a mi hija". X, y, z, x, y, z. "Ay sí, solo quiero que seas feliz". Pero en la familia me tratan con el género que no es. Me dicen que soy su hijo.

- Ella dice que soy su hijo.

- Lo lamento. Los que se supone que me aman más son los que me dan más traumas. Elijo no estar cerca de eso. Crecí en una familia donde había violencia doméstica, GERENTE DE PROYECTO Y ARTISTA y mi padre era alguien a quien nunca quería parecerme. Tuve que defender a mi madre de sus ataques físicos, una de las últimas veces, y creo que fue la última vez que tuve que defenderla fue cuando lo corté con un cuchillo. En esos momentos, no me vi como una niñita ayudando a mi mamá. Me vi como el muchacho que tenía que pelear contra su padre, y que sería quien protegería a mi madre de este hombre. ¿Cuál es tu opinión sobre la importancia de la familia para la gente transexual? Muchos de nosotros hemos sido rechazados por la familia en la que nacimos, y esas familias pueden las más ser crueles, incluso más crueles que un extraño en la calle. Si no hubiera sido por mi tiempo en Brown, mi tiempo conociendo gente homosexual, no habría tenido familia. Cuando fui rechazada por mi padre, y repito, él mandaba, así que mi mamá no pudo decir nada sobre el hecho de que no podía ir a casa. Así que, ¿a dónde fui durante las vacaciones y feriados? Fui a casa de algunos de mis amigos. Mis amistades eran más que solo amistades. Se convirtieron en mi familia. Somos un grupo de homosexuales peligrosos. La intersección entre la familia elegida, en el arte, especialmente en el arte escénico y el activismo estimularon la lucha por los derechos trans y LGBTQ desde Stonewall hace 50 años es lo que le está dando forma a nuestro futuro. Mi familia siempre ha sido con gente negra homosexual desde el momento en que llegué a Atlanta hasta hoy. Son personas que se dieron a la tarea de hacer espacio, de ser visibles, de organizarse juntos. Esas son las personas que me recibieron. Ellos entendieron por lo que estaba pasando. Según tú, ¿cuál es el poder o fuerza en esta mezcla de familia elegida, el arte y el activismo? La meta siempre ha sido cambiar los corazones y las mentes. Si puedes lograr eso, se crea un sendero que permitirá hacer lo electoral, las victorias legislativas, para poder realmente cambiar las condiciones materiales de la vida de la gente y que reciban el apoyo y recursos y accesos a cosas que les tienen prohibidas. Creo que esa es la manera de mover las cosas. Pero este ha sido un ejemplo en nuestra historia que realmente nos permitió hacer un cambio legislativo en los derechos civiles, todo fue el surgimiento de la cultura y los artistas que lucharon con firmeza sobre lo que debía cambiarse. Nina Simone, todas esas personas, ¿verdad? Y hoy en día, solo quiero poder celebrar a las personas transexuales y homosexuales que intentan caminar ese mismo sendero de liberación en su forma de arte y también en el activismo en su comunidad. Es ponerles el espejo a las personas. A veces es crear otro vehículo para contar una historia para que las personas puedan conectarse con la humanidad, para que puedan conectarse a nivel personal, conectarse con cómo funciona el sistema y el lugar que ocupan en ese papel. Creo que ese es nuestro trabajo. Ese es nuestro trabajo como artistas. Ese es nuestro trabajo como activistas. Es nuestro trabajo como homosexuales, como transexuales que intentan sobrevivir juntos, crear una comunidad, celebrar nuestras rarezas y nuestros talentos y nuestra brillantez y creatividad, pensar fuera de lo normal y al mismo tiempo avanzar hacia la visión de que un día no tengamos que luchar así. Porque aunque vengas de una familia de lazos sanguíneos o parentesco o elección, nosotros luchamos por la familia. Monte y Kiwan fueron excelentes artistas. Fueron sinceros en todo lo político que apoyaban. Y así perdimos dos estrellas. Lo diré así. Perdimos dos estrellas. Monte era lo máximo. Kiwan era lo máximo.